Tag: family communication

Teepa Snow Entertains While Teaching About Dementia

Elizabeth Happy Healthy Caregiver and Teepa Snow

Teepa Snow engaged hundreds of Cobb County family Caregivers and further expanded their understanding of dementia. I had the privilege to hear Teepa – one of America’s leading dementia educators on dementia – at an event called ‘A Day with Teepa Snow: Today’s Voice for Dementia’ on Friday, March 31st at the Due West United Methodist Church.

I had no idea what to expect from this event since I have never even seen or heard Teepa speak. Her training is highly praised and I wanted to learn more about dementia.

Only Teepa Snow can make learning about dementia entertaining. She’s witty, spunky, and she swears (in a church!). She drives home the importance of visual cues by using her hands while she instructs. (more…)

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How Improv Can Improve Communication with Our Dementia & Alzheimer’s Loved Ones

Tami Neumann & Cathy Braxton Dementia RAW

Expert Interview – Tami Neumann & Cathy Braxton

Meet Tami Neumann & Cathy Braxton, two ladies who are disrupting the aging industry and the way Caregivers communicate with those we care for who have dementia and Alzheimer’s. Tami & Cathy are on a mission to replace the overwhelming and frustrating communication techniques with something simple,fun, and easy to remember. Their improv training workshops and resources are equipping family Caregivers with new communication tools to practice with their loved ones that have dementia or Alzheimer’s. In this Expert Interview post, learn how some of their improv techniques can improve your communication with those you love.

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How to Stay Connected with Your Long Distance Aging Parent

A guest post written by Family Caregiver Sarah Allen

Staying Connected with Mom

My mother has taken care of me for most of my life. Now she is struggling with the early stages of Alzheimer’s Disease, and I know it is my time to step up to the plate and return the favor.

Rather than continuously visit nursing homes, rehabilitation centers and try to pay for a home aid ourselves, we moved her in with my family and I take care of her.

My sister Emily lives out of town, but is constantly looking for ways to keep in touch because she can’t see my mom every day. With so many families in our situation, most know it is hard to keep in touch with loved ones we can’t see often. Here are some ways that you can stay close to loved ones.

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How to have a Courageous Conversation With Those You Love

Courageous Conversation

I didn’t coin the phrase ‘courageous conversation’, I first heard this term from my sister who used it in the context of meetings she has with her employees where she has to often coach them on how they can improve.

When she shared that term with me, I immediately thought of those uncomfortable but necessary conversations I have had to have with my parents.

After my dad retired, my parents made Florida their primary residence and Michigan their summer residence. They lived independently for many years and outsourced the tasks and jobs that they really no longer wanted to do and could afford someone else to do such as housekeeping and yard maintenance.

Gradually over the years, independent living became a struggle and the amount of everyday living tasks that were being outsourced expanded.  Individuals were hired to grocery shop, prepare meals and snacks, and run errands. Then, as my mom became less mobile, personal assistance was needed organizing medications, massaging and wrapping her legs, showering, driving and accompanying her to various doctor appointments.

While they lived on the ocean in their dream home, they were mostly confined to the condo. Independent living for them was like wading in the ocean. When their health was status quo and their help was coming consistently, life was doable. But, as soon as a big unexpected wave crashed in, it would topple them over and have a ripple effect on our entire family. (more…)

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